Digestion

Archive for the ‘blogs’ Category

After adding @adagencylayoffs to my list of people I’m following on Twitter (via Three Minds On Digital Marketing), I started thinking about the usage and value of Twitter.

At the moment I’m following 115 Twitterers. I doubt that’s a lot by Twitter user standards (anyone know a stat? have a link?), but I will say that it is becoming more challenging to keep up with the tweets and weed out what information I want or should be noting. By now I know there are certain followers I should be paying more attention to (i.e. the agency planners, marketing innovators, marketers, etc.). But what about the new people I’m following? If I find their tweets are valuable and informative, how do I stay as close to their tweets as possible?

I think the answer right now is that I just need to become a frequent tweet checker. For a quick scan of updates, I use Twitterfox, which is a nice app that alerts me to my latest tweets. However, it’s a bit addicting as I’m always seeing pop-up notifications and then I of-course need to check out the various links being tweeted.

I wonder, what will Twitter create for its users in the future, so they/we can make the most of our network and the information being shared?

Twitter, like Facebook, should incorporate some kind of filtering tool. On Facebook, users can adjust (to a degree, and I don’t know how Facebook does this from a technical standpoint) the amount of updates they receive from certain friends. This feature is found under “Options For News Feed” at the bottom of the main page. Do you want to see more updates on certain stories (news, i.e. status updates, photo updates, etc)? Slide your preferences up or down. Do you want to more closely stalk someone? Does someone post too many updates (that’s probably me, apologies)? Add these people to the appropriate lists.

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A filtering/tweet tool would be most helpful for users utilizing Twitter for professional means, i.e. marketers, research people, and job seekers like myself. For instance, I’m following a few Twitterers who post social media jobs. If I had a tool that could put their tweets ahead of the majority of tweets, I could save time reading through updates that aren’t as relevant to my job search.

Another option Twitter could consider that is different from Facebook’s model would be to create a tool that would allow for tweets on a timed basis. For example, a user could choose to receive tweets from @”name” every 3 hours, or once a day.

Or, maybe this is a combination of these two ideas – creating groups or tiers of preferred Twitterers. Twitter could create three tiers and users would add people to tiers according to how valuable they find them. So I would choose to put the most interesting or job-related Twitterers into my top tier, and their tweets would appear more frequently compared to those under tier 2 and tier 3. Perhaps a simple slide tool or ranking button could be added to each Twitterer’s info under “following”. Next to Device updates, add the slide tool or tier option.

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I’m kind-of surprised Twitter hasn’t already done this. Thoughts, anyone?

I’m a visual person so tag clouds or any other fun planning tools like Wordle capture my interest. Wordle is a neat tool that puts text from any source you provide (copy/paste text, blog link, del.icio.us link) and spits it out in word cloud form. Play around with layout, font, and color. Create your Worlde cloud here. And then, add to the gallery. (There’s no sign-up required, but as I see I used my initials as my ‘username’ I ended up being linked to all the other “CK”s. I only made the one cloud below.)

Here’s my Wordle cloud for my del.icio.us bookmarks, taken today:

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Not too surprising to me is what my top bookmark topics appear to be: eating & food experiences in Minneapolis, design, and fashion.

I just added this post to the Fallon planning blog…thoughts on generous brands and their Election Day involvement.

Today I sat in on my 1st Fallon Brainfood presentation, which focused on mobile media. While planner Aki Spicer and producer Marty Weatherall scooped us on the ever-growing usage and utility of mobile media/marketing, viewers (live and virtual) sent in photos which were added to the Fallon Brainfood Mobile gallery. You can still send in pics by texting/emailing to Fallon@fanchatter.com. Check them out here. For the live presentation, watch here. You can also find the slideshow there or on SlideShare. Click on Spock!

Mobile Media pres

How is it that I’ve never seen this? Via someone’s Tumblr, via Ning, I stumbled upon Minneapolis Metblogs. This is just one city-focused blog that is a part of over-arching Metroblogging, “the world’s largest network of city-focused blogs, covering local issues in over 50 cities in the world”.

 

What is Metroblogging?

Metroblogging started off as a more locally focused alternative news source in Los Angeles and has turned into the largest and fastest growing network of city-specific blogs on the Web. We got sick of reading local news that was syndicated from the other side of the country, or was just repurposed national chit chat that had nothing to do with our city. We created our first blog as a throw back to the days when a local news paper focused on local issues, and you could walk down to the corner coffee shop and chat up the reporters whose column you read earlier that day. This idea didn’t stay in one city for long and before we knew it there were Metblogs in Chicago, Portland, Karachi, and Vienna. Today there are over 50 Metblogs in countries all over the world. Local politics, event reviews, lunch recommendations and ways to avoid that big traffic jam downtown. If it’s happening in our cities, we’re on it.

They’re featured in Forbes’ “Best of Web” Directory.

With such collectively-sourced blogs like this, it encourages us to consider the validity and power of citizen journalism. And, whether or not this form of content is becoming more of an authoritative voice in whatever its respective category may be. In what way is it becoming a more valuable source as we continue to question the media and increasingly look to peer review and word-of-mouth perspective? 

Also see citizen media, user-generated content, citizen journalism sources.

I like this explanation of social media. It’s something even my parents would get. See 123 Social Media‘s definition here.


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