Digestion

Archive for the ‘books’ Category

“How does time perspective shape our lives?” is the question…

Thanks, Adam for this video from @GoogleTalks, through the Authors@Google series.

In The Time Paradox, Drs. Zimbardo and Boyd draw on thirty years of pioneering research to reveal, for the first time, how your individual time perspective shapes your life and is shaped by the world around you. Further, they demonstrate that your and every other individual’s time zones interact to create national cultures, economics, and personal destinies.

I’m bored so I’m running through the latest RCRDLBL free downloads. Here’s what I’m adding:

“Shampoo [Alternate Version]” / Elvis Perkins

“Slow Burning Crimes” / East Hundred

“The Echo” and “Why Not” / Voxhaul Broadcast

“Round N Round [feat 77Klash]” / Bosco Delray

“Pine On” / Obits

And speaking of music – today I was at the bookstore and came across This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession by Daniel Levitin. Levitin, a musician turned neuroscientist, reveals the science behind our preferences for music, among other topics such as:

  • Is there a cutoff point for acquiring new tastes in music?
  • What do PET scans and MRIs reveal about the brain’s response to music?
  • Is musical pleasure different from other kinds of pleasure?

This is yet another book I’m adding to my ‘must read’ list!

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A soon-to-be planner friend of mine pointed me in the direction of a great post on how to create your own ‘brand’, ‘Have You Registered Your Personal Trademarks?‘ at the Organic blog, Three Minds on Digital Marketing. One interesting tool mentioned is the Online Identity Calculator(TM), which claims “is the first and leading tool that will help you make sense of your Google results and give you advice on how to build a stellar online identity that’s aligned with your real-world personal brand.” So, I gave it a whirl…

First, I enter my name in Google. Next, I count the number of times other Courtney Kuehns appear on the first three pages of results. Then I answer a series of questions, asking for my interpretation of the results’ influence on my aspirations of who I want to be in the professional sense. (because remember, this tool is about helping you determine your online idenity as ‘your brand’) I’ve Googled myself many a time (who hasn’t?) so I didn’t expect a shame-inducing report…and the results? Apparently, “Courtney Kuehn” is Digitally Distinct.

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According to this graph, I put forth high volume and am highly relevant. I think this generally means two things: I have online presence (I blog, I Tweet, I leave comments, I’ve been in news stories) and there are no negative links out there. With a short analysis of why I am Digitally Distinct, I learn I can fine-tune Courtney Kuehn online in Ch. 11 in Career Distinction: Stand Out By Building Your Brand.

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I think almost everyone knows it’s becoming more and more obvious that today it is easy to build the ‘online You’. And, depending on the industry or field in which you work, having a high level of positive online presence can act as a career booster. A key factor in creating the online You is consistency. This is something I need to work on. I.e. I should blog more, I should write more, I should probably kick up my commenting activity. But sometimes, it’s tough. (Hey, I’ve been trying to establish and create the Real World Me for the past 20-something years. This is more important than the online Me, right?)

Yesterday I spotted Mygazines.com via PSFK. This seems like a great resource for people who:

  • are magazine junkies (like myself) – Perhaps you can’t give up any more space in your office/home/bathroom to another stack and it pains you to toss out your 2005 VOGUE collection. Though the physical experience of reading a magazine is lost, Mygazines.com offers the content, including ads (benefit to advertisers!)
  • work in advertising, marketing, media, etc – though the quality isn’t perfect, this might be a handy tool for quick competitor reference (if you work in print)

Basic features of Mygazines include:

  1. browse – choose from 17 categories (arts & culture, home & garden, travel, etc.) And, for specific titles, try searching the sub-categories.
  2. upload – not necessary in order to browse, but helpful for sharing purposes
  3. archive – save an article, entire magazine, or bookmark (Del.icio.us, Digg, Technorati, etc.) However, there seems to be a bug with the saving option. At least, that is my user experience thus far.

When reading a story, actions you can take:

  • zoom (only once)
  • rate
  • comment
  • send/share

I’m using Mygazines.com on Firefox and the magazines pop up in a new window. Zooming is helpful, though sometimes it isn’t the best quality (even when enlarging text, it’s fuzzy). Depending on how careful users are when uploading magazines, the pages may or may not be cut off a bit (or crooked). One very smart feature is the “pages” option, which can be found on the right vertical toolbar, third icon down (specific direction for those of you, like my dear mother, who have difficulty turning on a laptop). “Pages” allows you to go straight to the articles you want to see, versus paging through the entire magazine including ads.

In reference to legality, PSFK writes that though it’s questionable, there is potential. “Mygazines could really provide a useful alternative outlet for publishers looking to reach more readers. When it’s free, your’e going to attract an audience.”

Overall, in my second day of browsing, Mygazines feels useful and fairly user-friendly. As far as the experience goes, it may greatly differ for users who are looking for visual stories (fashion/design inspiration) versus those needing a financial reference in a cut-and-dry article. But, you be the judge, as always.


It’s been a week or so since I made the jump from Blogger to WordPress and I’ve yet to give much attention to the “about me” section, or as I’ve called it, “Who I Am”. In lieu of a more professional and creative description, I’ve updated the section with one idea today.

That idea is about showing my consumption love for White Castle. Despite my penchant for the not-too-greasy and dainty burgers, I’d never visited White Castle’s website. Currently there are some nice features on the main site: a game promotion, a new product (scrapbook), and an interactive game/conversation.

The scrapbook, appropriately titled By the Sackful, is a recipe book commemorating 85 years of Slyder greatness. Find Craver stories (Cravers = fans), vintage photos, in addition to a variety of recipes. Not only was I surprised to learn that White Castle has such longevity, but they also are socially and community minded. All proceeds for By the Sackful will go towards the non-profit, Turkeys 4 America. Turkeys 4 America provides turkeys to families in need during the holidays. At $9.95 a book, you can afford to buy one for you and one for your friend. I have no idea how much a 15-lb turkey costs, but $20 sounds like it would cover one bird.

wc-cookbook_250.jpgI like being pleasantly surprised by a brand or product. Especially if this brand/product is already a part of my life, I enjoy the new little piece of information I discover.

I’m not a designer but I like looking at design stuff. The Minneapolis design firm Capsule has produced Design Matters/Logos 01, aimed to show the logo-making (right terminology? doubt it) step-by-step. This includes strategy and research for you plannerly types (ahem, see photo). (see Cool Hunting and Amazon.com)

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