Digestion

Archive for the ‘culture’ Category

“How does time perspective shape our lives?” is the question…

Thanks, Adam for this video from @GoogleTalks, through the Authors@Google series.

In The Time Paradox, Drs. Zimbardo and Boyd draw on thirty years of pioneering research to reveal, for the first time, how your individual time perspective shapes your life and is shaped by the world around you. Further, they demonstrate that your and every other individual’s time zones interact to create national cultures, economics, and personal destinies.

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One of my latest Fallon Planning internship projects has been to help build next week’s Brainfood presentation. The topic is heroes. Through the lens of the superhero and pop culture, we’ll explore the heightened relevance of heroes, what it means to be a hero today, and how brands can empower your inner hero.

My Superhero made on Marvel.com

This is hosted by Alyson Heller, Strategic Planner, as well as myself. Event info is as follows:

Fallon Brainfood: The Return of the Real Hero, from Caricature to Character

Date: Thursday, January 15, 2009
Time: 12pm CST/1pm EST/10am PST
Location: Fallon Stage 24 (for employees) and here on the Interwebnets (for everybody else)

If you work at Fallon, come see Brainfood on the 24th floor. And if you don’t work at Fallon, watch Brainfood live @ Fallon Planning Blog at http://fallontrendpoint.blogspot.com/ or UStream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/fallon-brainfood (sound and video only).

(Also, see the Facebook event I created here.)

What is Brainfood, you ask?
Brainfood is a monthly all-agency lunch conducted by Fallon Planners. Wide-ranging topics explore trends, business issues, and actionable opportunities for our brands. Moreover, Brainfood offers us a chance to come together, share a beer and some pizza, and engage in a stimulating discussion on a variety of interesting topics that affect our business. Past Brainfood presentations have included trends and hot button issues such as The Mobile 10: Mobile Media, Virtuality, Design For All, China Rising, Latin America in the Age of Web 2.0, Social 10-Trends in Social Media, Blogging the Agency, and more.

Missed previous Brainfoods? Go to http://www.slideshare.net/akispicer/slideshows for a sampling.

logoI’m on the Minnesota Public Radio Public Insight Network, so from time to time they’ll send emails asking for input on a variety of topics. Today they’ve asked “How do you manage family at the holidays?” They write:

Holiday togetherness: Good, bad or ugly?
For many, holidays are a time to be with those we love. But those who are closest to us are also able to drive us the craziest.
What are the topics of conversation, questions and activities that you’re hoping to avoid this holiday season? And how will you keep yourself sane?
Maybe it’s questions like, “When are you getting married?” or conversations about politics.  Or perhaps it’s the annual family game of Risk. Do you find yourself playing with the kids, turning on the TV or volunteering to do the dishes to avoid what you know is coming?

They said I could pass this email along, so instead I’m spreading the word here. Share your stories here: How do you manage your family at the holidays?

Isn’t it time we reinvigorate our thinking and start asking more questions? Yes, says The Atlantic. Their refreshing thought initiative, The Atlantic Project, challenges America to Think. Again. 


Get in on the discussion starting with a range of questions such as:

Should women settle? Why do Presidents lie? Which religion will win? Is porn adultery? Is Google making us stupid? When is evil cool?

Each topic is accompanied with sources for more reference (beyond your own opinion and knowledge). Click on an image or topic at the bottom of the page and find either an article, short documentary, video, and/or blog for more information.

Ready. Set. Go.

I love this image.

Spied on WIRED by Josh McHugh. By the Swiss graphic designer Martin Woodtli. The image accompanies a story on Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson’s forth-coming book, The Superorganism. Given the color and intensity of the image, my first thought was that this WIRED story was specifically about art, a new technology, or music (something visually or tangibly creative). So I was a bit intrigued to read that it was about evolution and the idea of ‘superorganisms’, which, until five minutes ago, I’d never heard of. In a previous book also by Wilson and also Bert Hölldobler, The Ants, it is explored whether “large groups of animals [could] function together as a single entity with distributed intelligence? Did evolution work through such groups, selecting at the group level rather than the individual?”

Aside from sparking controversy and conversation in the biological world, it got web geeks and thinkers talking.

“Cybervisionaries saw in the superorganism an ideal way of describing the networked global brain that they were just beginning to imagine…Wired‘s Kevin Kelly drew on Wilson’s theories for the conceptual framework of the Hive Mind, humanity’s emerging cognitive interconnectedness. Even today, Kelly is writing about the One Machine and the Technium, a neologism he defines as “a superorganism of technology.”

This brings to mind the communication ‘processes’ and power of social networking communities when working as an entity across and outside of the web. Thoughts? I need to read up more on this idea…

Oh yeah. And now maybe I see relevancy of this colorful image. It sort-of symbolizes many (different) strands merging (converging?) into a single mass.

  • If you’re looking for some different/challenging pumpkin carving patterns, check out these politically charged designs at Campaign-O-Lanterns.

 

  • Love this product and what it communicates: Create your own message with the DIY Screenprinted LCD Card. 4 lines of 5-character fields lets you personalize your digital greeting. Cards are printed on 100% recycled paper. 5 for $15. From San Francisco shop Yellow Owl Workshop



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