Digestion

Archive for the ‘sex’ Category

Isn’t it time we reinvigorate our thinking and start asking more questions? Yes, says The Atlantic. Their refreshing thought initiative, The Atlantic Project, challenges America to Think. Again. 


Get in on the discussion starting with a range of questions such as:

Should women settle? Why do Presidents lie? Which religion will win? Is porn adultery? Is Google making us stupid? When is evil cool?

Each topic is accompanied with sources for more reference (beyond your own opinion and knowledge). Click on an image or topic at the bottom of the page and find either an article, short documentary, video, and/or blog for more information.

Ready. Set. Go.

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Current TV created a hilarious, spot-on how-to for navigating the path to love in today’s text-addicted culture.

Watching (and laughing) at this video got me thinking…While I do a fair amount of texting in general, compared to my circle of friends, I still believe in actual phone conversations. When it comes to romantic relationships – potential and real – I appreciate the actual effort that is made on my behalf to better establish real communication. True, I shoot off a ‘casual’ text to say hello or what’s up? but in this day and age, it’s too easy to get lazy and use the text in place of real conversation. We need to gauge the nature/status/level of our relationships with those we want to reach out to and ask, ‘Is a text more appropriate or a phone call?’ Too much texting with too little real talking, or sporadic and random texting is a bit confusing, and borders on frustrating. Who agrees with me?

What is sexy? Have fun exploring ideas of sexyness with K-Y Brand. This is a fun place to share your quick thoughts on the concept of “sexy”. Of-course, it’s no fun giving if you’re not receiving, so don’t be afraid to play around with the swirling sexy phrases – here you can see what others have offered up.

What is most interesting is the filtering tool to the left of the phrases. By de-selecting gender and moving the age markers around, you get a rough idea of who thinks what is sexy. I’m curious to know how many people 70+ have shared their thoughts. (Maybe you should send this to your grandma?) I’m most interested in the male 20-30 demographic, so I turned the women off and adjusted the age marker. A few definitions of sexy appeared: naked on an elephant, naked bus driving, naked jumping jacks. And corndogs. At least K-Y can confidently infer that men think nakedness is sexy. Hah. Jokes aside, there’re some sweetly unique responses as well.

I appreciate the fresh and fun vibe of this interactive experience. Unlike a lot of brands, K-Y isn’t telling us how to think or act, what to buy, or what kind of person we should be. As they say under the “Sexy Is” rollover, our definition of sexy is much more interesting than theirs (true), and by collectively sharing our own “sexy mantras”, we can help create a create a new attitude of what’s hot.

So what is sexy?

PSFK’s recent post on Japanese love hotels brings to light some interesting facts:

  1. There’re approx. 25k love hotels in Japan.
  2. About 2% of Japanese adults visit/day.
  3. The industry generates more $$$ than the UK’s hotel market.

FYI, love hotels are defined on Wikipedia as: a type of short-stay hotel found in Japan operated primarily for the purpose of allowing couples privacy to have sexual intercourse.

I wonder, are most visitors prostitutes and their clients? Young couples who don’t have privacy because they live with their parents? Being there are so many of these establishments, what does this say about Japanese culture, specifically, romantic relationships (or lack thereof?). Ironically, later on yesterday, I read about the new book Consuming Bodies: Sex and Contemporary Japanese Art. Looks fairly provocative, and no doubt sheds a little light on the above questions, but specifically focuses on: “the themes of sex and consumerism in contemporary Japanese art and how they connect with the wider historical, social and political conditions in Japanese culture.”


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