Digestion

Posts Tagged ‘community

My friend Jessiena, just sent me a link to Hunch. She’s so great, up on what’s cool in digital. (She better, she works at Popular Front. They only like smart people.)

So far there’s not much to Hunch – it hasn’t fully launched but has started sending invitations to people who sign up. The landing page says

hunch

Hunch helps you make decisions and gets smarter the more you use it.

Check out more info on the Fact Sheet. Over-generalizing, it sounds like it’s a much smarter, technologically-oriented Magic 8 Ball. After giving users 10 questions, Hunch will “will propose a concrete and customized result for hundreds of decisions of every kind”. By utilizing user-created responses (edits, ideas, suggestions, etc.) and customizing results per user, Hunch aims to harness group think and machine learning – with the ultimate goal being to help you and I out with decision making.

The idea of Hunch sounds fascinating – harnessing group think/collective intelligence to help people solve problems makes sense, right? And the fact that results will be based on structure — algorithm, increased user involvement, etc. — makes for a potentially convincing and useful service. I think Hunch is one to watch – Flickr co-founder Catarina Fake, is co-founder, so you’d think these people believe in design, usability, and solutions.

Advertisements

This is what happens when you post thought-provoking life questions in the form of street art. The Poster Public Project challenges people to pause, stop and think. The artist, Elay, asks:

Imagine you saw a colour in your dream, which you have never seen before. It doesn’t consist of any colours or shades that you know. Trying to describe that colour would be as difficult as trying to believe that there is enough love & compassion in the world so every human can feel happiness.

Do you think this is possible? Can you do this? I think some people would have more difficulty than others…maybe it’s a matter of how much strength and faith we carry in ourselves…

elay1elay2

via Wooster Collective via Urban Prankster

How is it that I’ve never seen this? Via someone’s Tumblr, via Ning, I stumbled upon Minneapolis Metblogs. This is just one city-focused blog that is a part of over-arching Metroblogging, “the world’s largest network of city-focused blogs, covering local issues in over 50 cities in the world”.

 

What is Metroblogging?

Metroblogging started off as a more locally focused alternative news source in Los Angeles and has turned into the largest and fastest growing network of city-specific blogs on the Web. We got sick of reading local news that was syndicated from the other side of the country, or was just repurposed national chit chat that had nothing to do with our city. We created our first blog as a throw back to the days when a local news paper focused on local issues, and you could walk down to the corner coffee shop and chat up the reporters whose column you read earlier that day. This idea didn’t stay in one city for long and before we knew it there were Metblogs in Chicago, Portland, Karachi, and Vienna. Today there are over 50 Metblogs in countries all over the world. Local politics, event reviews, lunch recommendations and ways to avoid that big traffic jam downtown. If it’s happening in our cities, we’re on it.

They’re featured in Forbes’ “Best of Web” Directory.

With such collectively-sourced blogs like this, it encourages us to consider the validity and power of citizen journalism. And, whether or not this form of content is becoming more of an authoritative voice in whatever its respective category may be. In what way is it becoming a more valuable source as we continue to question the media and increasingly look to peer review and word-of-mouth perspective? 

Also see citizen media, user-generated content, citizen journalism sources.

Isn’t it time we reinvigorate our thinking and start asking more questions? Yes, says The Atlantic. Their refreshing thought initiative, The Atlantic Project, challenges America to Think. Again. 


Get in on the discussion starting with a range of questions such as:

Should women settle? Why do Presidents lie? Which religion will win? Is porn adultery? Is Google making us stupid? When is evil cool?

Each topic is accompanied with sources for more reference (beyond your own opinion and knowledge). Click on an image or topic at the bottom of the page and find either an article, short documentary, video, and/or blog for more information.

Ready. Set. Go.

I just experienced my 1st caucus. A few observations of interest to me:

1. When I drove up to my caucus, I was taken aback by the line. It wrapped around the corner of the church. I was thankful it wasn’t -10 degrees like it has been lately.

2. Once inside, I noticed that 95% of the crowd looked to be 35 or under. Gave me encouragement when I saw us younger people out, trying to instigate change.

3. The voting process was so easy. And surprisingly non-technical, as I thought it might be. I wrote my name, address, email, phone number, and district on a sheet of paper. Then I was handed a piece of paper that looked like it was meant for covering a Bingo game card. I was slightly confused as to how to cast my vote. After wandering over to what looked like a paper-wrapped shoebox that said “ballots”, I firmly wrote “Barack Obama”. And dropped the little piece of paper inside the slot.

4. I took some pics so I could engage in some “citizen journalism” via The New York Times.com. Browse them all here. (I submitted 4, not sure which one are up yet.)

If you’re planning on going to caucus on Tues. 2/5, consider snapping a few pictures for The Polling Place Photo Project.

via The New York Times:
The Polling Place Photo Project is a nationwide experiment in citizen journalism that encourages voters to capture, post and share photographs of this year’s primaries, caucuses and general election. By documenting local voting experiences, participants can contribute to an archive of photographs that captures the richness and complexity of voting in America.”

“Citizen journalism” – love it.

Take part in storytelling.

Shepard Fairey has created limited edition silkscreens of Barack Obama. At $50 each, they go on sale starting tomorrow (Wed. 1/30). Order yours by emailing info@obeygiant.com and use “OBAMA” in the subject line. via Cool Hunting, Fairey has “an aim to get its iconic image across the nation in time for Super Tuesday (5 February) and beyond. Proceeds will go to a larger, statewide (California) poster campaign.

obama.jpg


Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

del.icio.us mmm

RSS Unknown Feed

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.